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Discuss PGroot's answer to: About "at" for study english.

...You at seem to have a great start... ...You seem to have a great start... Are both usages correct? could you tell me what is the different?

"at" does not belong in this sentence.  The preposition at is often used for designating a place, such as "at work" or "at the ball park".  But there is always an object of the preposition.  The preposition at might be used to designate time, such as "at noon" or "at first glance".  A sentence that begins "You at first glance seem to have a great start ..." would be possible.

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seturyo Thinks this answer is Helpful:

Thank you, Dear PGroot I am listening audio cassettes for English listening. But I actually heard " You at seem to..." Could I send the mp3 file to you for detail? Thank you very much

 
seturyo Thinks this answer is Helpful:

Thank you, Dear PGroot I am listening audio cassettes for English listening. But I actually heard " You at seem to..." Could I send the mp3 file to you for detail? Thank you very much

 
PGroot

It could be "You'd seem to"

 
PGroot

It could be "You had seemed to"

 
seturyo Thinks this answer is Helpful:

thank you, i also send a private message to you.

 
seturyo Thinks this answer is Helpful:

could it be "you as seem to"?

 
seturyo Thinks this answer is Helpful:

I listen the mp3 one more time, I think there is not said "You at seem to have..." I think maybe he said "You as seem to have..." Could you tell me "You as seem to have..." is correct usages?

 
PGroot

No, "as" does not belong.  The possible words to go there are helper verbs.  "You have seemed to" or "You would seem to" or "You had seemed to"

 
seturyo Thinks this answer is Helpful:

Thank you very much I have send mp3 file to your email, could you please confirm this.

 
PGroot

It sounds like "You, ah, seem to" which would be just another meaningless sound like "uh".

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