Originated From
AOL Search

Where can i find the poem "he's not dead, he's just asleep"

where can i find the poem "he's not dead, he's just asleep"

Liked this question? Tell your friends about it

Answers

Our community lost a 16yo boy in a fiery crash 2 days ago. I went looking for this poem too. It actually "he's not dead, he's just away..." I found it at www.mtholyoke.edu/~rsamaran/poem.html. If that doesn't work, I typed in "he is not dead, he's just away" using Google and it was the 1st or 2nd result. It was the fourth poem down on the page. It is by James Whitcomb Riley. I hope this helps. You have my deepest sympathies for your loss. I hope this brings you the comfort it has brought me now and in the past.

Related Questions

Other people asked questions on similar topics, check out the answers they received:

Asked: Poem ending with

poem ending with "grow old with me the best is yet to be"

Asked: I'm looking for a poem WWII or earlier about the ...

I'm looking for a poem WWII or earlier about the bravest people are the ones that sit home and wait

Asked: What is the meaning of the poem "The Secret" with ...

Can anyone tell me what is the meaning or history is of the poem below? The Secret Author Unknown We have a secret, just we three, The robin, and I, and the sweet cherry-tree; The bird told the ...

More Questions

A poem about a child drinking cocoa from a cup

It is better to have it written with professional poem maker.

Poem "the mask

Is this by chance called The Mask I Wear , starts with the below paragraph ? Don't be fooled by me. Don't be fooled by the face I wear For I wear a mask. I wear a thousand masks- masks that I'm afraid to take off and none of them are me.

Looking for a poem

I don't know of anything modern, but Emily Dickenson wrote a poem about her house burning & what was actually important. Can't recall the name (sorry) but it was considered quite radical at the time. since it delt with worldly goods vs. entirely God. God's in there--but she ponders her home.

Help with poem

The poem is "Notting Hill Polka," by W. Bridges-Adam. The line goes, "An' we've put the tin | What the Arsenic's in | At the bottom of the Ser-pen-tine!" You can read it at the bottom of this page: http://books.google.com/books?id=VAsbwi-Zba0C&pg=PA43&lpg=PA43