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What is the nether ye?

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It means "Lower eye" in Middle English, and is generally referenced for its use in The Miller's Tale by Chaucer (line744: "And Absolon hath kist hir nether ye"). 

Actually, it may mean anus, although Chaucer's use of it remains ambiguous. In "Chaucer and the Fictions of Gender," the author states that it's taken as a variant of "nether ende." This was possibly for rhyming purposes since the two lines together read: For al his kepyng and his jalousye; And Absolon hath kist hir nether ye; Lending support to this is in the same Millers Tale, Chaucer uses the term "queynte" to describe a woman's genitals: And prively he caughte hire by the queynte. (Line 3276) Queynte is Old English for the Latin "pudendum," meaning "that wherefore one ought to feel shame." The term queynte is most likely where we got the modern c-word (sorry, just couldn't write it).

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